Ferrari Grand Touring at Pebble Beach – Class M1

Class M-1 or Grand Touring Ferraris is literally the challenge for the title of the most desirable car of the year at Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. This year 8 sublime Ferraris from 3 coachbuilders were competing in this class. 5 by maestro Scaglietti, 2 by Pininfarina and one by Ghia. You can also check out our gallery for Class M2 here

M1-01) 1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Ghia Coupe Chassis No. 0145 E – David & Susanna Nelson, Bath, OH

1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupé Ghia 0145E
1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupé Ghia 0145E

The Ferrari 212 Inter and Europa series were built between the end of 1950 and 1953. A total of 78 chassis were built, powered by the Gioacchino Colombo–designed, 2562 cc, 60-degree V12 engine coupled with a 5-speed gearbox. The 212s carried a variety of coachwork built by some of Italy’s finest carrozzerie, including Pinin Farina, Stabilimenti Farina, Touring, Vignale and, as with this example, Ghia. This Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe is one of six built in this configuration and was first shown at the 1951 Turin Motor Show. It was imported into the United States in 1960, but its history is unknown until the 1970s. It lived in Southern California during the 1980s, and its current owner acquired the car in 1989, but it was by then without its original engine and needed a complete restoration. When the finished car was shown in 2014, news came that the original engine had been found in Boston by Ferrari experts Marcel Massini and Paul Russell, and engine and chassis were reunited at the Ferrari Classiche workshops in Maranello.

M1-02) 1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Pinin Farina Coupe, Chassis No. 0407 GTPegasus Collection, Palm Beach, FL – Third in Class

1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Coupé Speciale Pinin Farina 0407GT
1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Coupé Speciale Pinin Farina 0407GT

The first Ferrari 250 GT was bodied by Pinin Farina and shown to the public at the 1953 Paris Auto Salon, where it caused a sensation. The Ferrari 250 Europa GT replaced the 212 Inter and shared the same chassis as the 375 America. This striking example is the 26th of 43 Ferrari 250 Europa GTs built and the sixth of eight custom-bodied by Pinin Farina. The car has several unique features, including the elongated low nose, a front grille containing dual fog lamps, and an unusual and large Cavallino Rampante Ferrari horse within a chromed circle. It also sports a rather unique Connolly leather interior in bright orange, tailored by Hermés in Paris. It was originally sold to Vincenzo Ferrario in Rome before going to the United States, where it was bought by Hal Rudow of Seattle, who actually won a race with the car at a Sports Car Club of America event at Shelton Airbase in March 1960 — the car’s first and only competitive outing.

M1-03) 1956 Ferrari 410 Superamerica Pinin Farina Coupe, Chassis No. 0491 SAPeter Wilde, Brookline, MA

1956 Ferrari 410 Superamerica 0491SA
1956 Ferrari 410 Superamerica 0491SA

The Ferrari 410 Superamerica was the successor to the 375 America. It was fitted with a 4.9-liter, Aurelio Lampredi–designed V12 engine with triple weber carburetors, which was basically a detuned version of the engine in the Ferrari 375 Plus that won both Le Mans and the Carrera Panamericana in 1954. This first series car is the 12th of 16 Superamerica Coupes built by Pinin Farina. It was originally finished in gray with a red roof and red leather upholstery. The car has been driven less than 8,000 miles in its entire life, and it has been shown twice before at the Pebble Beach Concours, once in 1986 by Greg Garrison and once in 2008 by Lee Herrington.

M1-04) 1960 Ferrari 250 GT Scaglietti Spyder California, Chassis No. 1685 GT – Lee & Joan Herrington/The Herrington Collection, Bow, NHFirst in Class

1963 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder 1685GT
1963 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder 1685GT

The Ferrari Spyder California was the result of a request from Ferrari’s two United States distributors, Luigi Chinetti and John von Neumann. They believed that the American market needed a convertible version of the Ferrari 250 GT TdF, something more powerful than the 250 GT Cabriolet already being built at Maranello. Once a deal had been agreed upon between Enzo Ferrari and his U.S. agents, production began in 1958. During that first year, 14 long-wheelbase Spyder Californias were built; the rest of the 50 LWB Spyders were built between 1959 and 1960. This car is the third from last to be built and, as a result, it was equipped with some of the features of the short- wheelbase Californias that followed, including the desirable “outside-plug” engine and factory disc brakes that became standard on the SWB cars. This car is further distinguished by its original factory hardtop.

M1-05) 1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Pinin Farina Aerodynamica Coupe Series I, Chassis No. 2373 SAThe Patterson Collection, Louisville, KY – Second in Class

1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico 2373SA
1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico 2373SA

The Ferrari 400 Superamerica replaced the 410 model; each one was specially built to order, with no two cars being exactly alike. The Series I Superamerica was powered by a 4-liter V12 engine derived from the 250 GT, and the chassis was a shortened version of the earlier 410. Later Series II models were produced with a longer wheelbase to accommodate rear seats. The first 400 Superamerica appeared at the 1959 Turin Motor Show, and 25 Series I cars followed. This car, one of seven similar Series I coupes built on the short chassis, was ordered by Brazilian mining billionaire Jaime Patino, who specified a number of special features, including several engine modifications as well as the addition of small wheel spats over the rear wheel arches. The result was a very fast car that had a unique look. Ferrari proudly showed the car at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show and, later that year, at the Paris Auto Salon.

M1-06) 1961 Ferrari 250 GT Pininfarina Cabriolet, Chassis No. 2587 GTJoseph & Margie Cassini, West Orange, NJ

1961 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II 2587GT
1961 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II 2587GT

This Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II is one of eight delivered in smoke gray Grigio Fumo paintwork with a beige leather interior. At the end of 1959, Ferrari introduced a second generation of Pinin Farina–bodied cabriolets that boasted strong performance but with perfect road manners. Just 200 Series II Cabriolets were built, and this car was the 131st to be delivered. The car was sold new to Mr. Daniel Balozian, a Frenchman living in California at the time, who owned it until 1986 when it was sold to Richard W. Gent of Euclid, Ohio. After several more owners and a change of paint color, the car was eventually purchased by the current owner, who commissioned a bare metal restoration back to its original, factory-correct appearance.

M1-07) 1963 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Scaglietti Spyder California Chassis No. 4103 GTScuderia Bella Rossa, Bedford Hills, NY

1963 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Spyder California 4103GT
1963 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Spyder California 4103GT

This Ferrari 250 GT was sold new in early 1963, through Ferrari dealership Charles Rezzaghi Motors of San Francisco, to its first owner, Edwin Schenk of Santa Rosa, California. It is the second to last of the 37 covered-headlight, short-wheelbase Spyder Californias and has been a California resident for the majority of its life, having been owned by a number of West Coast Ferrari collectors. An interesting detail found on these later SWB second series cars is the configuration of the rear fender lines, which are narrower than the earlier SWB Spyders. This particular matching-numbers car is finished in period-correct Blue Scuro paintwork with a dark tobacco brown interior. It has been extensively rallied and is still regularly driven by its current owner, who acquired the car in 2007.

M1-08) 1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast Pininfarina Coupe, Chassis No. 8019 SF Peter Wilde, Brookline, MA

1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast 8019SF
1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast 8019SF

The final generation of Ferrari’s “America Series” Super-coupes was the aptly named Superfast, built by Pininfarina between 1964 and 1966. The Superfast’s 5-liter engine was the most developed version of Gioacchino Colombo’s original V12 unit; its 350 hp propelled the car to a top speed of over 175 mph. Just 37 Superfasts were produced, and they were sold to some of Ferrari’s wealthiest customers. This car is the 27th built and one of 12 Series II cars with a 5-speed manual transmission. It was first shown at the Brussels Motor Show in 1966 before it was sold via Ferrari’s New York agent, Luigi Chinetti. This particular car was shown at Pebble Beach in 1993 and 2002 when owned by its long-term caretaker, Gil Nickel, who bought the car in the early 1970s and owned it for over 40 years.

All photos by ©Richard Michael Owen and ©Sam Noroozi

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